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anger 101

There have been times in a nurse’s busy life when she comes across individuals who would just be so good at extinguishing that deep sense of patience and peace the nurse carries within. These individuals may be fellow nurses, superiors, clients, doctors, med-techs, pharmacists, or practically anyone the nurse comes across with. The most common individuals who are triumphant with this task are the doctors, the clients themselves, and the significant others.

Scenario 1: You receive a telephone order for a new medication from the attending physician. You administer it and you transcribe it. However, your client had a negative reaction to the medication. The doctor totally refutes that he ever made an order and refused to sign the order sheet. Grrrrr!!!!!

Scenario 2: You are making rounds to administer medications. You are wearing you complete uniform with your ID, your PRC license card and your intravenous therapy card. You are administering the medication and the significant others blurt out: “Do you know what you are doing?” in front of a handful of people. You would just want to slap him with the IVT license you have. Another Grrrrr!!!

Scenario 3: You are making rounds and making your assessment of your clients. One of your client told you that she feels well and does not have complaints. You leave and she smiles. The doctor then came in a few minutes later and your patient starts making up a story that you are not attending to his care. Capital GGGRRRR!!

There are various other scenarios like  this that are enough to burst our bubbles and make our blood go from 0 degrees to 100 degrees. There are scenes like this in a nurse’s life that he cannot escape as they are part of the unique world of culture and humanity. They are, in my opinion, challenges that we must face everyday. It is during times like this that we feel so disgruntled and that justice has eluded us. If your blood has boiled during any situation you encounter, what do you do?

“Never Let Anger Control You”

Whatever happens, never let the situation take hold of you. You are a mature, an educated, and a professional individual. You will get through this. Do not stoop down to a level where you lose all respect and dignity for yourself. Whatever the situation is, and however great the magnitude, pull yourself together.

“Talk to people you can TRUST”

When you are angry, it is very easy for you to say hurtful words, especially ones you will regret later. Never let yourself lose control. Find your colleagues or your superior whom you can trust. Albeit, know who you must trust. Be extra vigilant when saying emotional things, especially to superiors and colleagues. What you say can, and will be used against you. Practice extreme vigilance.

trust

“Silence”

If you cannot find someone to trust, or if you feel that you are not ready to share what you feel, maintain silence. Continue doing your job and do not let the anger continue to race inside you. Remember though, if you do not let it go, or if you do not talk about it, you will be in the position to think about the situation the entire day. It may, or may not have the potential to make or break your day.

“Understand”

Understand why the people are trying to ruin your day. Understand that we live in a diverse world. Clients are people in pain and may find other people to blame for what they are feeling or experiencing. Make it a point to understand each and every one of them. If it is not your fault, and you have experienced deep offense, talk to them about it in a private and professional setting. Set your limits and enumerate what is required of your professional or nurse-client relationships.

calm nurse

“Remember that you are a professional and that you are a nurse”

You are a nurse and you are a professional. Nothing further is needed to be stated. Keep in mind that you are a professional and while wearing your uniform, you must maintain that aura; no excuses. More so, you are a nurse. Of all professionals, it is you who is expected to have a very high level of patience as you deal with people in their worsts ever in their lives. You work with people who are sick and are ailing and you must always have a high level of patience in order to understand these people.

Whatever happens in your everyday duty life, never ever forget that you are a nurse. You were educated to finish your Bachelor’s Degree and you were trained to care for the ailing populace of society. In everything you do, everywhere you go, and whatever time it is, do not ever let anger steer you. You have professionalism and dignity. Do not let a little “GRRRR!” make you lose it. Do not let yourself be the laughing stock of the nurse’s station. Keep it real, but keep it together, always.

PS: If all else fails, there’s always a 50cc syringe there, 50cc of air, and the 5th intercostal space midclavicular line. Just kiddin’

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JD Gopez, R.N. I am a Professional Registered Nurse with skills in literature, analysis, and comprehension.I am currently employed as a staff nurse at a Tertiary Hospital. I am just a simple nurse who enjoys writing.