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So you have passed the board exams, breezed through applications and interviews and now you have been hired on type-of-nurse-co-workers-stationyour first job. In preparing yourself for this new journey, there are things that you need to be aware of aside from the company’s policies and procedures. Day by day we encounter different types of people from all walks of life. If you can’t keep up with them it’s alright because you only meet them for a few times. But what about the different types of co-workers that you get to be with all year round? They may inspire, enlighten, annoy, or drive you nuts but before you meet them, you should have a heads up on what they are like and how you can deal with them. Here are the different types of co-workers you might encounter at your station:

  1. The know-it-all from the latest trends in patient care to the latest gossip in the four corners of the hospital, these employees have their eyes and ears always at the ready. True or not true, that is the question most employees would ask about their flash reports. However, as a new employee you should be extremely careful on what you share with your co-workers because not all can be trusted and not all can keep secrets to themselves.
  2. The sensei these may not be the head nurses or the senior nurses, but one thing’s for sure, these are the co-workers that bother to teach you the ropes without being told to. They simply see themselves in you when they were starting out as clueless trainees with accidents waiting to happen. These are the ones you should stick with as they are willing to pass on to new staffs the knowledge they need to know.
  3. The complaint specialist this type of co-worker are the ones who always have a say on everything and everyone but do not have the guts to tell the concerned person or the management about it. They are just there to criticize but after a few years, they are usually the ones who are still there, feeling miserable about the things they are complaining about. In dealing with them, you must not absorb the negativity they let out and go on doing your job because listening to their rants can take the time you should be using to finish your charting instead.
  4. The positively charged ever looked up to someone because he still manages to maintain composure despite of the workload he currently has? No case is ever too toxic for these nurses as they look into every challenge as an adventure wherein fear is not in their vocabulary. They usually work in silence and will finish earlier than everybody because they are focus and driven and you should be asking for useful tips from them whenever you can so that one day you can be as efficient as they are.
  5. The overly relaxed ever seen a co-worker working hard to do nothing at work? This is exactly what the overly relaxed is like. You will usually see them playing with their phones or taking a nap in the corner. If the call bell on room 222 goes on be sure to attend to that because they surely will be passing it on to you whenever they can. To protect yourself and your hard earned license from putting a patient at greater risk because of the laziness of these staffs, you can document if you have referred to them their patients’ concerns.

No matter which one of these co-workers you encounter, remember that you are a unique individual and you can also make an identity for yourself. Just keep in mind to be someone who can be reliable and efficient in patient care. Who knows? Your efforts may be known not only by the patients, but with your co-workers and your boss as well.

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She is a registered nurse both in the Philippines and in the state of Texas with a masters degree from the Philippine Women's University. An active member of several organizations, she is one of the Philippine Nurses's Association (PNA) officers in her district and acts as a chief nurse in a private hospital. She also serves as a writer and researcher for a US-based nursing website dedicated in helping aspiring students pass the NCLEX which paved the way in publishing her co-written eBook entitled NCLEX Questions: Top Meds on NCLEX RN.